Stonehenge, Place of Enlightenment

StonehengeStonehengeStonehenge. What can I, an amateur, really say about this ancient prehistoric monument? I feel that pictures alone can do justice to this precious place. Yet, I cannot go without writing a few words about this grand landmark (one of the oldest monuments in the world) seeing as I made it my mission to see it while in England. In partnership with the English Heritage and the National Trust, Stonehenge, which sits just outside of Larkhill, is preserved so that visitors like me can walk in the footsteps of ancient people, while pondering about the stones existence and placement.
StonehengeThis mysterious place raises many questions in my mind. The ancient temple is thought to be aligned with the movement of the sun, however, researchers, scientists, and archeologists are not entirely sure of its purpose. We still don’t know the real reason why it was built. That’s what makes this place so extraordinary. The stones (the blue stones weigh 3-4 tonnes each, while the other stones weigh 30 tonnes) are known to have been erected and placed 4500 years ago (2500 BC – 3000 BC) by a group of so called sophisticated prehistoric people. This group of individuals knew exactly what they were during, even if we are not entirely certain of their exact purpose(s). It is believed that it took 30 million hours of labour to construct the stones in their exact placement (due to not having modern technology like we have today). Preserving Stonehenge in its countryside grassy-land environment makes the site feel natural and ancient. The reconstructed Neolithic houses surrounding Stonehenge’s landscape makes the region an outdoor learning center and museum.Stonehenge

StonehengeLandmarks that are in their natural setting are the ones I enjoy the most. The Roman ruins and Colosseo in Rome fascinated me beyond belief. Stonehenge too left me enamored and curious about this giant ball of dirt we call earth. Seeing extravagant landmarks such as this make me feel like a small spec in retrospect, yet thankful and gracious that I have the opportunity to explore throughout the world. Stonehenge was the second to last great landmark I visited while in Europe so that experience is especially significant because I truly was cherishing the time I had left in Europe, while walking the grassy fields of Stonehenge. The relaxing environment allowed me time to reflect on my previous travels while standing in awe of one grand wonder of this world–Stonehenge.Stonehenge

 

14 thoughts on “Stonehenge, Place of Enlightenment

  1. I loved Stonehenge as well. Although it is a shame that you have to do the “hamster” round. Lots of touristic stuff instead of the strong energy place it used to be a few years ago. But anyway, it is special and like you it is a place I wanted have been to once in my life! Btw. the weather on your pictures looks exactly like the weather we had, when we where there…. England 😉 !

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  2. I love Stonehenge too. I had been obsessed with it since I first watched a program about it on the National Geographic channel as a kid. Standing beside those stones was definitely one of the highlights of my trip when I visited. I’m so glad you were able to experience it too!

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